Friday, 27 February 2015

REPORTING ANIMAL ABUSE TO THE FBI AND INTERPOL

If you witness abuse to children or animals in videos or pictures on Facebook or other internet sites, please do not report to site managers as they will not usually take any action to stop the abuse, or assist police in inquiries and valuable evidence would be lost.
CTRL F will search this article.
The FBI Is classifying animal abuse as a top-tier felony[2 Oct 2014] Earlier this week The Federal Bureau of Investigation announced that animal abuse will be prosecuted as a “crime against society,” making it a Group A felony equal to arson and murder in the eyes of the law.
Abuse an animal, and you’ll be considered among the ranks of murderers and cannibals.
The AP reports that The FBI will prosecute intentional abuse and torture, gross neglect, sexual abuse and organized abuse, which includes dog fights.
The policy change is an effort to prosecute more animal abusers, landing them in jail and setting an example. Animal abuse is not simply a minor crime.
How to report apparent animal abuse onlineIf you know where the abuser lives, report the incident/s to their local police station as local police often do investigate and take action against online crime.  Often that person will be involved in other crimes affecting his neighborhood.
If you do not know the location, instructions how to find an ISP are further on in this article under DNSstuff.
Report crimes to Interpol for crime committed outside of the US or The FBI for crime within the US.  Within the UK report to the Police and to the RSPCA.
Instructions for reporting animal cruelty and pedophiles on Facebook1. Do not report to Facebook.
2. Send the URL for the picture or video you want to report.3. Put your email address in the appropriate box, put “GRAPHIC VIOLENCE ON FACEBOOK [or other site]” in the subject box, and then paste the “URL” for the photo or video you wish to report – with a brief message to Interpol (see below for sample).  If possible, include some screenshots, which could be used as evidence.
Sample StatementI have been witness to blatant animal cruelty (or child abuse) on Facebook at the following link: _________
These images are extremely disturbing and clearly establish blatant crimes against animals (or children).
After viewing the provided material, you will understand that this is indicative of unlawful acts of animal cruelty (or child abuse) as established by the (Animal Welfare Act) and relevant local and international statutes.
I respectfully request that your resources be applied to remove this material and charge the perpetrators with relevant unlawful crimes.
Thank you for your rapid attention to this urgent appeal.
Signed______
Reporting Internet Animal Abuse [HSUS Information]The Internet can be a powerful medium for connecting us to information to combat animal cruelty, but it also can be a haven for animal abusers who celebrate and actively advertise their shocking crimes. The best way to stop this type of abuse is to immediately report it to the proper authorities and to refrain from contacting, visiting or forwarding links to the offending sites.
Why is it important to report suspected Internet animal cruelty?Reporting any type of suspected animal cruelty may save animals’ lives as well as people’s lives. When animals are abused, people are also at risk. The Link® between animal abuse and other forms of societal violence is well-documented. That is why it is critical to immediately report conduct on the Internet that you suspect may be — or that you know is — animal abuse.
If I see animal cruelty on the Internet, what should I doImmediately contact the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), a partnership between The FBI and the National White Collar Crime Center, at
http://www.ic3.gov/
The website will direct you to the page where you can file your complaint. At first glance, it may appear that the website will only consider complaints of Internet monetary fraud. However, IC3 is the proper venue for all Internet crimes, including animal abuse.
IC3 can best process your complaint if the information you provide is as detailed and complete as possible. This includes providing the complete URL (website address) for the website that displayed the suspected animal cruelty.
Even if you are located outside the United States, IC3 will review your report as long as the suspected abuser is located in the United States.
What happens after I file a report with the IC3?
IC3 will email your report ID and password to you, along with a link to an area on the IC3 website where you can view your report and enter any additional information.
Upon receipt of your report, IC3 will carefully evaluate it and refer it to the appropriate federal, state, local or international law enforcement or regulatory agencies. Every report that is referred is sent to one or more law enforcement or regulatory agencies that have jurisdiction over the matter. At that point, the report may be assigned to an investigator. IC3 cannot guarantee that your complaint will be investigated.
What else can I do?As abusive content often violates the user agreement that the creator of the website has signed with the Internet Service Provider (ISP), notifying the ISP about the abusive content may result in the website being removed from the Internet.
To make a report to the ISP, you need to determine who hosts the website. To do that, go to http://www.domaintools.com/, enter the website URL in the “Whois Lookup” search box and click on the search button. Scroll down the results page until you find the numerical Internet Protocol (IP) address assigned to the website. Then go to http://www.arin.net/(American Registry for Internet Numbers) and enter that IP address in the “Search WHOIS” box and click on the search button.
The search results page will provide information about the ISP that hosts the website. The page also might display information about how to report abuse. If it does not, go to search.org/programs/hightech/isp and find the complete contact information for the ISP on the list. All of this information should also be included in your FBI complaint form, where possible.
If you believe an animal is in immediate harm, and if the location is known, contact local police and your local FBI branch office as soon as possible. To locate your local FBI branch, visithttp://www.fbi.gov/contact/fo/fo.htm.
How does the law currently handle Internet animal cruelty?Because communications through the Internet have the ability to cross state lines, the Internet is largely governed by federal law. Improving the federal laws as they pertain to Internet animal abuse is critical. Currently, only a few federal laws address the issue directly:
The Crush Act (P.L.106-152) penalizes the display of acts of cruelty and sexual abuse of animals that is intended for interstate commerce. If convicted, offenders may receive up to five years in prison or a large fine. Two criteria must be met before this statute applies: 1) actual abuse must occur and 2) the website in question must intend to sell the images across state lines.
In other words, a website may legally display images of animal cruelty and sexual abuse under this law as long as it is not charging visitors for access or otherwise selling the images. In 2005, the first conviction under this statute occurred in a federal district court in Virginia.
The Animal Fighting Prohibition Enforcement Act (P.L. 110-27) strengthens the ability of law enforcement to combat animal fighting by providing felony penalties for interstate commerce, import and export related to animal fighting activities, including commerce in cockfighting weapons. Each violation of this federal law is punishable by up to three years in prison and up to a $250,000 fine for perpetrators.
Internet Hunting: The Computer-Assisted Remote Hunting Act (H.R. 2711/S. 2422) is a pending federal bill introduced by Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA) and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI). It seeks to prohibit knowingly making available a “computer-assisted remote hunt” (using a computer or other device, equipment or software to control the aiming and discharge of a weapon to hunt).
Filing a Complaint with the IC3
The IC3 accepts online Internet crime complaints from either the actual victim or from a third party to the complainant. We can best process your complaint if we receive accurate and complete information from you. Therefore, we request that you provide the following information when filing a complaint:
  • Your name
  • Your mailing address
  • Your telephone number
  • The name, address, telephone number, and Web address, if available, of the individual or organization you believe defrauded you.
  • Specific details on how, why, and when you believe you were defrauded.
  • Any other relevant information you believe is necessary to support your complaint.
Reporting animal cruelty outside the USA
If the crime is not within the US, it should be reported to INTERPOL. You must include as much information as you can including links to the offending material, names, locations, etc. More information further on in this article.
The submission page for crime tips for INTERPOL
http://www.interpol.int/Forms/Contact_INTERPOL
Reporting animal cruelty within the USAThe FBI investigates all forms of cybercrime and reports can be submitted at FBI Cybercrime Investigations Report
http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/investigate/cyber
You would follow these instructions to report a US based crime, even if you are not a resident of the US or are not located within the US at the time of the discovery.
To report an animal cruelty or abuse crime that takes place within the United States, report the incident to The FBI. You must include as much information as you can including links to the offending material, names, locations, etc.
The submission page for crime tips for The FBI is
https://tips.fbi.gov/
A US based animal cruelty website ought to be reported to the Internet Crime Complaint Center, also known as IC3.
The Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) is a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C).
There is no category for animal abuse, so choose a category and explain the situation in the notes. As much information as possible should be included in the report including links to the offending website.
Other resources for reporting Internet animal abuse, especially if you believe an animal to be in danger at the current time IE live streaming video, and you know the location of the offending party, include reporting to the local police and the possible offender’s local FBI branch which can be determined here:
http://www.fbi.gov/contact-us/field
FBI 1
FBI 2
PETA People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
To report an animal in imminent dangerhttp://www.peta.org/about/contact-peta/report-cruelty.aspxhttp://www.peta.org/about/contact-peta/email-form.aspx
Check for any specific laws protecting certain species here
http://www.fws.gov/
WildLeaks secure whistleblower site for wildlife and forest crime
https://wildleaks.org/
Cleaning Up the InternetWith sites like Myspace and Youtube, please immediately bring any offensive videos to PETA’s attention by emailing us at Info@peta.org.
We require a direct link to the video and to the poster’s web page. Do not post angry comments, and do not complain to the social-networking or video-sharing site about the video, as it might remove the video before PETA has the opportunity to investigate.
As a precaution, please download the video and save the web page/user profile so that PETA can be sure to view both. After our investigation, we will petition the site to remove the video and delete the user’s account.
In cases involving commercial gore and pornography based websites carrying videos of animal abuse for shock purposes, your response will be different. Find the contact address for the website, and identify the website’s Internet Service Provider (ISP). DNSstuff can help you do both.
DNSstuffUsing this site to find contact information for a website is easy. Use the “WHOIS Lookup” option (on the left side of the DNSstuff home page) to perform a search using the domain name. The domain name for PETA’s website, for example, is “PETA.org.” Again, don’t complain directly to the offending site, as this will only encourage the site owner. Instead, report it to the appropriate FBI office at http://www.fbi.gov/contact/fo/fo.htm
http://www.dnsstuff.com also makes it easy to find information about the offending website’s Internet service provider (ISP).  First, use the “ping” tool on DNSstuff’s home page to find the IP (Internet Protocol) address for the website; all you have to do is enter the domain name!
Then, enter the IP address into DNSstuff’s “IPWHOIS Lookup” search field, and you’ll get the ISP information! In addition to contacting the ISP representatives directly and explaining to them why the site and/or the offensive files should be removed, ISP information should also be included in your FBI complaint.
NotesThe internet is rife with websites and webpages depicting cruelty to animals. Some sources are educational, depicting the cruel behind-the-scenes reality of industries that thrive on animal exploitation and abuse. Other sources are merely depicting cruelty for shock value. Often, these sites will also carry videos and images that are gory and/or pornographic in nature.
These websites are counting on you to be upset by what you see, inadvertently bringing them more traffic—and consequently more advertising dollars—with your complaints to friends, family, and coworkers. The site owners thrive on your angry messages, often posting them for their sympathetic audiences to enjoy.
Social-networking sites like Myspace and media-sharing sites like Youtube allow users to create their own webpages (in the case of Myspace) and to post blogs, photos, videos, and music. Some people abuse this service by posting videos depicting crimes against animals. Many abusers have been brought to justice after flaunting these crimes online. With your help, we will continue to put these abusers behind bars.
Important notes on how and where to report animal cruelty
The Internet delivers an astounding array of images and ideas into homes across the world—but not all of these images are particularly animal-friendly. In the United States, individuals have the constitutional right to free speech, which includes the right to discuss and advocate for animal abuse in public forums like the Internet.
Unfortunately, some of what is being shown online crosses into the realm of illegal activity. Rest assured, animal cruelty is a crime in every state—if people go beyond discussion and actually practice what they preach, they can be prosecuted for animal cruelty under their local laws.
What is a hoax?
While some online images of animal cruelty are, sadly, all too real, many websites that appear, at first glance, to promote animal cruelty are hoaxes. Of course, websites that are disturbing or disgusting are not breaking the law if no animals are actually being harmed. While you can certainly express your opposition to these sites to the companies that host them, be aware that their content is protected by the First Amendment.
Remember, hoaxes and parodies on the Internet, no matter how offensive, are exempt from cruelty laws.
Where to report
Find out who is responsible for investigating and enforcing the anti-cruelty codes in your town, county and/or state. These people typically work for your local humane organization, animal control agency, taxpayer-funded animal shelter or police precinct.
If you run into trouble finding the correct agency to contact, you should call or visit your local police department and ask for their help in enforcing the law. If your local police department is unable to assist, ask your local shelter or animal control agency for advice.
Reporting online cruelty
This applies to any abuse seen on the internet worldwide, on any site.  Do not protest to Facebook, Youtube, Google, blogging platforms such as WordPress or any other website to “shut down or remove” animal abuse sites, videos or pictures. As none of these sites report animal abuse to law enforcement agencies. The reason for this is that they may shut down the pages or sites, leaving no avenue for the people to be located and arrested and prosecuted, or for the animals to be located and saved.
The main things you must NOT do:
Do not contact the website owner
While it may be mildly therapeutic to tell them what you think of them and their actions, you will be alerting them to their discovery and they may remove the offensive information.
Do not flag the website for removal from a public site
Wherever this is, whether it is on Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, Youtube, Google or others, as that may cause deletion of the pictures or videos, and consequently loss of evidence needed to build a case against the offender.
Do not share the information with others
Other may act in either of the above ways which will lead to loss of necessary evidence. Sharing the website may also increase traffic to the website in question which may support or excite the offender, or even scare him off.
Do not create an online petition
For the same reasons as listed above.
Collect your evidence
Collect as much information as possible. If you are lacking some of the information listed below, you should still share the information that you do have, and a link to the website with the appropriate reporting agency.
Download as much of the information from the website, IE photos, videos, etc. as you can and save them. Print out copies of the offending pages.
Be sure to have as much personal information on the person running the website as possible including, but not limited to, the name, contact information, and location. Try to determine if the offender is within the United States or elsewhere.
Silent Witness
Silent Witness is a non-profit program created to give citizens the opportunity to assist law enforcement in solving crimes. Citizens remain completely anonymous and are paid cash rewards of up to $1,000 when the information they provide leads to an arrest or indictment.
Established in 1979, Silent Witness works in partnership with the community, media and law enforcement, and is a member of both Crime Stoppers USA and Crime Stoppers International
http://silentwitness.org/index.aspx
Facebook page on animal cruelty for advice or other
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Animal-Cruelty-Exposed/363725540304160
Report animal cruelty taking place in a pet storeFor concerns about animal cruelty in pet stores, please contact the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). Contact its headquarters at (301) 734-7833, visit www.aphis.usda.gov or email ace@aphis.usda.gov. The USDA will direct you to the appropriate regional department to which you will be asked to submit your complaint in writing.
Report cruelty by an animal breederwww.aphis.usda.gov
For concerns about an animal breeder, please contact the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). You can contact its headquarters at (301) 734-7833, visit this website or email ace@aphis.usda.gov. The USDA will direct you to the appropriate regional department to which you will be asked to submit your complaint in writing.
The HSUS has established a $5,000 reward program for anyone providing information which leads to the arrest and conviction of animal cruelty in puppy mill operations. All information will be confidential. Please call 1-877-MILL-TIP
Report dog fighting activityPlease note it is now a federal crime to attend a dog fight
http://politix.topix.com/story/10354-its-now-a-federal-crime-for-you-to-attend-a-dog-fight
Report animal hoarding
http://www.animalhoarding.com/
Report acts of cruelty and sexual abuse of animals
http://www.stopcrush.org/?page_id=65
https://www.facebook.com/STOPCRUSH.ORG
Report illegal hunting
Information on hunts, shoots, gamekeepers, where hunts are meeting, places, dates etc., people you suspect of being involved in bloodsports, anybody seen digging for badgers or foxes
http://nottinghamhuntsabs.weebly.com/about-us.html
http://www.nwhsa.org.uk/index.htm
Call 1-800-628-7275 to report poachers in national parks to the National Parks and Conservation Association
If you see any items made from seal products (fur, meat or oil) contact CAFT immediately at caft@caft.org.uk
http://www.caft.org.uk/contact.html
Report wildlife crimes and poaching
https://wildleaks.org
Call 911 to report poaching in progress or dangerous wildlife complaints
Call 1-877-933-9847 to report non-emergency poaching violations or dangerous wildlife complaints
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and Plants WorldwideCall PCAPS at 309-672-2440 if you see an animal at risk
http://www.pcap.ws/contact.htmAnimals without appropriate shelter and either impounding affected animals or issuing citations for violations.
Animal cruelty within the UKThe RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) has a 24 hour hotline available for such incidents. From within the UK, call the cruelty line on 0300 1234 999.
League Against Cruel Sports UKWildlife Crime Reporting Formhttp://e-activist.com/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=122&ea.campaign.id=12419
Wildlife Crimewatch Line 01483 361 108Information specifically needed:
- Meet Cards for hunts- Advance warning of any cub (autumn) hunt meets
– Information on individuals who are part of groups/gangs      who commit cruelty to animals in the name of sport
- Information on people who attend, organise or travel to hare coursing events, or any information on where such events are going to take place
Animal cruelty internationallyHow you can help
WSPA World Society Protection of Animalshttp://www.wspa.org.uk/helping/action/
It can be very frustrating to be aware of animal welfare issues that don’t seem to be being addressed, but feel helpless to do anything about them.  All is not lost, here are a few things to consider that may help you decide whether something needs to be done, and who by.
Firstly, is another animal welfare organisation working on this issue, but perhaps elsewhere?  Sometimes there is a knock-on effect where a successful project in one locality can be replicated in others.  Even the world’s biggest animal welfare organisations cannot address every issue there is, and have to focus where they can effect the greatest change.  We would recommend supporting their efforts, even if they haven’t reached your locality yet.
Are there local organisations working on other animal welfare issues, or on animal welfare generally?  Sometimes it is more effective to take a general approach to animal welfare by addressing some of the larger or more widely-spread issues thus establishing an interest among the local community and the authorities in improving animal welfare.  This might not solve the problem you see right in front of right now, but it might be necessary to achieve this before being able to address the issue you’re concerned about at all.  We would recommend supporting your local animal welfare groups.
Who has the power to change things?  Sometimes the issue you are concerned about is illegal or contrary to local cultural values.  Even if it is not, you may still wish to object.  We would recommend reporting your concerns to the relevant local authority.  Please remember to be polite and concise, to refer to the animal welfare concern directly.  Justify your objection with scientific reasoning and propose an effective and ethical alternative or solution.
How do I access resources to back me up?  There are plenty of resources to support all kinds of animal welfare concern and we would encourage you to reference animal welfare successes in other areas, reports from animal welfare organisations and recommend animal welfare guides where appropriate.  You can find these by contacting relevant animal welfare organisations or visiting websites that contain expert advice.
International Companion Animal Management Coalition
http://icam-coalition.org/resources.html
for resources relating to stray dog population management in several different languages.
World Animal Net Useful Links
http://worldanimal.net/useful-linkscontains listings of over 17,000 animal welfare (and related) societies in more than 170 countries.